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mullinex:

Akai MPC 2000XL.
"I CAN’T STAND ART ACTUALLY. I’VE NEVER, EVER LIKED ART, EVER. I NEVER TOOK IT IN SCHOOL."

Hammons

thanks Anthony Cokes for making this page! From a 1986 interview with David Hammons

(via halfletterpress)

(via halfletterpress)

"When my daughter was about seven years old, she asked me one day what I did at work. I told her I worked at the college — that my job was to teach people how to draw. She stared at me, incredulous, and said, “You mean they forget?”"

— Howard Ikemoto (via huariqueje)

(Source: huariqueje, via actegratuit)

yeezius:

Mos Def
thekeepsake:

David Hammons, Concerto in Black and Blue, at Ace Gallery, NY, 2002

THE ART AUDIENCE IS THE WORST AUDIENCE IN THE WORLD. IT’S OVERLY EDUCATED, IT’S CONSERVATIVE, IT’S OUT TO CRITICIZE NOT TO UNDERSTAND, AND IT NEVER HAS ANY FUN. WHY SHOULD I SPEND MY TIME PLAYING TO THAT AUDIENCE?
from an interview with David Hammons, 1986


cc ejanefoto
"This is a time when there is not a black or white line in sight – just a million shades of grey."

Ellen Caldwell, “FACT, FICTION, AND FRICTION: FROHAWK TWO FEATHERS” in New American Paintings

ehhhhh, thats a ‘black or white” statement in and of itself tho. some things are black and white, others aren’t. thats a silly assertion, no matter the topic.

(Source: newamericanpaintings.wordpress.com)

thetuesdayafter:

Jenny Holzer
mentaltimetraveller:

Esther Kläs · “Champs Élysées” at Palais de Tokyo

oh my god
Dostoyevsky’s notes for Chapter 5 of The Brothers Karamazov
"

In various schools in Uganda, and some other parts of Africa, children as young as five are punished for speaking African languages, indigenous languages and mother tongues at school. The modes of punishment differ. The most common one in Uganda is wearing a dirty sack until you meet someone else speaking their mother tongue and then you pass the sack on to them. In some schools, there are specific pupils and students tasked with compiling lists of fellow pupils and students speaking mother tongues. This list is then handed over to a teacher responsible for punishing these language rule-breakers. According to Gilbert Kaburu, some schools have aprons that read: “Shame on me, I was speaking vernacular” handed over to an offender of the No Vernacular rule, who then is tasked with finding the next culprit to give the apron. Most of the punishments, in their symbolism emphasise the uselessness of the African languages.

Commenting on a photo of two children in Uganda wearing dirty sacks as punishment for speaking their mother tongues, Zimbabwean writer, Tendai Huchu says:

“That sums up our self loathing and inferiority complex. Junot Diaz once said we do a better job of enforcing white supremacy ourselves than white supremacists ever could. I should add, notice how the punishment consists of wearing sack-cloth. The image is telling. You are rags if you speak your own language.”

Halima Hosh, agreeing with Tendai Huchu opines:

“It’s outrageous. What a slave mentality that a colonial language is considered higher or better/more worth than their own local language. Unbelievable. Do the Europeans learn any African language in school? No. Why not? Because we are not proud of our heritage, not proud of our languages, not proud of Black African history. These teachers need to be fired.

"

This is a serious problem. Read the entire article here: http://thisisafrica.me/schools-punishing-children-speaking-african-languages/ (via linglife)

Languages don’t generally become endangered because people just don’t really feel like speaking them anymore: it’s often much more brutal. And similar methods for repressing indigenous languages happen all over the world: this reminded me of a memorable quote from a man in Alaska “Whenever I speak Tlingit, I can still taste the soap.” 

(via allthingslinguistic)

(via altcrit)